[teknoids] Re: Tech Audit for Law Students

Kris Niedringhaus krisn at gsu.edu
Mon Jul 29 16:17:51 EDT 2013


One approach would be to create the list of skills and competencies through a CALI Topic Grid and that provides guidance to potential lesson authors as to what is needed. The Legal Research Community Authoring Project uses this idea for the legal research lessons. You ought to be able to see the legal research grid from a link on this page (http://www.cali.org/static/lrcap) but the link goes to the wrong thing. (Sarah? Elmer?)

In this way you have the macro level concept of a generally agreed to list of skills and a centralized warehouse for training.

My 2 cents,
Kris


Kristina L. Niedringhaus
Associate Dean for Library and Information Services
Associate Professor of Law
Georgia State University College of Law
404.413.9140
law.gsu.edu<http://law.gsu.edu/library/>



From: teknoids-bounces at ruckus.law.cornell.edu [mailto:teknoids-bounces at ruckus.law.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Wilhelmina Randtke
Sent: Monday, July 29, 2013 3:44 PM
To: Teknoids
Subject: Re: [teknoids] Re: Tech Audit for Law Students

What would be more useful centrally is a listing of skills and competencies.  I think many law libraries have legal research training, and maybe CALI lessons are part of that, maybe they aren't.  For legal research training, librarians are more likely to have a set of competencies in mind and feel comfortable selecting material and moving from scattered lessons to a certificate program.  So, pretty much everyone in the field is going to feel that pulling a federal legislative history is something to know.

For technology training, there's no framework to fit lessons into.  No matter how simple, I've been in a library environment where I was the only one who knew that thing existed - email folders, the "print screen" keyboard button for screenshots, OCR through internet search engine or Acrobat Professional, etc.  But, also, the lawyers failing that competencies test didn't know about printing to PDF, which is really basic, so maybe I would skip over it when it's needed.  It's better to list some competencies and start at the macro level.

It's better to centrally track what skills are needed and are lacking.

-Wilhelmina Randtke

On Mon, Jul 29, 2013 at 11:35 AM, Sarah Glassmeyer <sarah at cali.org<mailto:sarah at cali.org>> wrote:
Okay, Teknoids, maybe we should put it this way....

If CALI were to have lessons available in tech skills, is that something you would find useful for your students.  Additionally/alternatively, would you like training on using CALI author to create home grown tutorials on issues local to your school such as "how to print" or "how to get exam software loaded on to your laptop"?
- Sarah

On Mon, Jul 29, 2013 at 9:00 AM, Elmer Masters <emasters at cali.org<mailto:emasters at cali.org>> wrote:
Don,
I saw this and several earlier pieces on the same project. I even
wrote a rather lengthy blog post about it back in May. The post closed
with challenge for Teknoids:

"Perhaps law schools should develop their own tech audit, a sort of
technical bar exam. Students who complete the exercises would receive
a certificate that indicates they've achieved a certain level of
technical competency in a set of software tools. Wouldn't it be great
if law schools had access to some sort of platform to create these
sorts of exercises, distribute them to students, track student
results, and issue certifications? You with me here? This is something
that could be done with the CALI platform. CALI Author for creating
and authoring the exercises, Classcaster for Lesson distribution, the
CALI Lesson system for student tracking. It's all there, just waiting
for someone to pick it up and run with it.

How about it Teknoids? Care to step up and get a piece of the change
coming to legal education?"

The full post is at http://elide.us/1Z and the challenge to this group
still stands.

Thanks,
Elmer.


On Thu, Jul 25, 2013 at 12:44 PM, Zhou, Dongfa <donzhou at stthomas.edu<mailto:donzhou at stthomas.edu>> wrote:
> Just wonder if anyone has seen this post a couple of weeks ago on technology audit.  The discussions are also typical when teaching of technology is mentioned:
>
> http://www.abajournal.com/legalrebels/article/could_you_pass_this_in-house_counsels_tech_test
>
>
>
>
> Don Zhou
> University of St. Thomas Law School
>


--
Elmer R. Masters
Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction
emasters at cali.org<mailto:emasters at cali.org>    773-332-7508<tel:773-332-7508>
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